Monday, 13 July 2015

Community Safety Fear of Crime "feelings of safety when walking alone after dark" Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003 Perceptions of Community Safety Anti-Social Vigilantism Hyper-Vigilantism the Rise of Ignominy by Covert Bullying Cyber Bullying Defamation Facebook Social Media Sexism Ageism Racism Appropriate Attitudes towards Men Social Exclusion Gender Equality Rule of Law Due Process Gender-Equal Application of the Law Rule of Law IS One Size Fits All Respect of One Person for Another Rumour Spread "#fearofcrime is different than the actual risk of becoming a victim of crime" AIC #bullying


"#fearofcrime is different than the actual risk of becoming a victim of crime" 


Australian Institute of Criminology



Samuel Lapp: I would only kill the bad man


Eli Lapp: Only the bad man. I see. And you know these bad men by sight? You are able to look into their hearts and see this badness?


Witness 

Directed by Peter Weir


"Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation.


Fine, they have every right to do so. 


But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. 

And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear." 

Pete Dowe




An example of so-called "social media savvy" the two Jill Meagher marches had no objective did not advocate to the authorities made a NO statement to rape and murder and violence against women. Wow. There is no YES case.
I believe those marches in the absence of any goals degenerated into vigilantism and lynch mob mentality. Why?
Because they can. Because #vigilantism is "social media savvy"
Because vigilantism is entry level ''community service'' with little effort nor commitment.
Except vigilantism is not a community service but is dressed up as one

Let's not forget the "good people" lynch-mob blamed Tom Meagher on assumption and profiling until Adrian Bayley was caught.
The “good people’’ did that to a Man whose wife had just been murdered!





Cyberbullying Law

 "Under Australian Commonwealth law it is an offence to “use a carriage service to menace, harass or cause offence, or for the purposes of a threat”. It is also an offence to “knowingly or recklessly use a telecommunications service in such a way as would be regarded by reasonable persons being, in all the circumstances, offensive”

Maximum Penalty 3 years Imprisonment



What does cyberbullying look like?
·         Being sent mean or hurtful text messages from someone you know or even someone you don’t know
·         Getting nasty, threatening or hurtful messages through social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter, or through sites where people can ask / answer questions like Formspring or Internet forums
·         People sending photos and videos of you to others to try and embarrass or hurt you
·         People spreading rumours about you via emails or social networking sites or text messages
·         People trying to stop you from communicating with others
·         People stealing your passwords or getting into your accounts and changing the information there
·         People setting up fake profiles pretending to be you, or posting messages or status updates from your accounts


Australian Human Rights Commission and Reach Out 2011


Feelings you may be having if you are being bullied

·         Feeling guilty like it is your fault
·         Feeling hopeless and stuck like you can’t get out of the situation
·         Feeling alone, like there is no one to help you
·         Feeling like you don’t fit in with the cool group
·         Feeling depressed and rejected by your friends and other groups of people
·         Feeling unsafe and afraid
·         Feeling confused and stressed out wondering what to do and why this is happening to you
·         Feeling ashamed that this is happening to you



Fear of crime is not the same as actual risk of becoming a victim of crime.

“Jill Meagher’s death tapped into all women's collective fears of the stranger and the dark alley,” says RMIT's Dr Anastasia Powell, a PHD in criminology...despite being a primal fear, it hardly ever happens.” 
According to the NSW Rape Crisis centre, only 1% of sexual assaults are committed by strangers 
"Dr Kirsty Duncanson, a social scientist of Latrobe University. says Meagher "emblematically represented" the new Brunswick demographic of “young, white, middle class, university educated, professional women”, many “newly married, or in long-term relationships and contemplating having children. 
Or else they have had children, and Jill Meagher very much appeared to be a younger version of themselves. So there is very much a sense of 'it could have been me.’

The Age June 11th 2013



 

Fear of Crime. 

This is a curly issue to raise, and although I write about high-fear, I must stress from the outset that VICTIMS DO NOT MAKE PERPETRATORS PERPETRATE, VICTIMS DO NOT ASK FOR IT, and WOMEN HAVE THE RIGHT TO WALK ANYWHERE ANYTIME. I seek here to put perspective on Fear of Crime. The Australian Institute of Criminology defines women as a high-fear of crime group. 

“A point of some importance is that “high-fear” groups are not especially characterised by age. Rather differences, hold within age groups. Thus, for instance, while it is well established that women are more fearful of crime than men (or at least admit to it more), younger women are more fearful than younger men, as well as older women being more fearful than older men.”

“Apart from the gender difference, other main findings are:

“people who live in high-crime areas are more likely than those who live in areas with lower levels of crime to be fearful”

“local disorder (such as noisy neighbours, poor street-lighting, and teenagers hanging around) is predictive of virtually all measures of fear”

“personal experience of being victimised, and greater contact with other victims, heightens fear”

The Australian Institute of Criminology also says that fear for “safety on the streets after dark” is a general, non-specific fear.  "The “safety on the streets after dark” question is a very common one in crime surveys, and indeed is sometimes the only one asked. The much higher levels of anxiety among older people in response to this question may well explain why the notion of excessive fear among older people has taken such hold."

"The reason why older people are more fearful about their safety on the streets alone at night is not entirely clear. Note that the question does not mention crime, and it could be that the prospect of being out alone on dark public streets may evoke anxiety about a greater range of mishaps (for example, falling over), especially as the emotional, physical and financial consequences could be worse for older people" (James & Graycar 2000).


"The question is also hypothetical for those who rarely go out alone after dark, which will be the case for many older people. It might also be that “street-crime” affecting older people is particularly overdramatised in the media—and many older people may form their perception of crime through this."



“Jill's (Meagher's) death tapped into all women's collective fears of the stranger and the dark alley,” 

says RMIT's Dr Anastasia Powell, a PHD in criminology and expert in hate-crimes against women.
But despite being a primal fear, it hardly ever happens. 

According to Dr Powell's research for VicHealth the most common form of death for Victorian women AGEDhttps://images-blogger-opensocial.googleusercontent.com/gadgets/proxy?url=http%3A%2F%2Fcdncache-a.akamaihd.net%2Fitems%2Fit%2Fimg%2Farrow-10x10.png&container=blogger&gadget=a&rewriteMime=image%2F* 15-44 is "intimate partner violence". 


Not cars, not smoking, but being killed by a man they know.


http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/a-crime-that-shook-our-city-20130611-2o1yj.html



Therefore organisations which promote women walking at night are promoting a high-fear-of-crime group to put itself in a high-fear-of-crime situation. Fine, they have every right to do so. But in this hyper-vigilant, high-fear era, we need to be clear on where the fear is coming from. And re vigilantism, we cannot scapegoat others for our pre-existing fear.


Pete Dowe




Fear of Crime Ch. 4


A Safe and Secure Environment for Older Australians


Marianne James, Adam Graycar and Pat Mayhew


Australian Institute of Criminology Research and Public Policy Series No. 51 2003


http://aic.gov.au/media_library/publications/rpp/51/rpp051.pdf


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