Sunday, 10 December 2017

Community Safety Cyberbullying Covert Bullying Social Exclusion Perth College Western Australia records drop in cyber bullying after mobile phone ban PerthNow December 6, 2017 Rumour Spread


"As a society we have only said NO to #overtbullying
We have opened the floodgates to #covertbullying and #cyberbullying #mobilephones
Woo hoo!"
Pete Dowe

"I wouldn't want to be a member of any group I had to denounce someone to be a member.
So I skipped the denunciation ceremony"


Pete Dowe



Perth College records drop in cyber bullying after mobile phone ban


PERTH College is hailing its break-time ban on mobile phones a success after noting a dip in cyber bullying and surge in meaningful interaction.
Principal Jenny Ethell said the decision to bar students from using mobile phones during recess and lunch breaks was initially met with some resistance but that girls at the school had adjusted quickly.
“Some of the students initially were afraid of missing out on what was happening on social media but because everyone is in the same boat I think that has actually given way to feelings of relief,” Mrs Ethell said. “It mean the girls now use break times to develop authentic relationships rather than just communicating through their mobiles.






Perth College is hailing its break-time ban on mobile phones a success after noting a dip in cyber bullying and surge in meaningful interaction.
Perth College is hailing its break-time ban on mobile phones a success after noting a dip in cyber bullying and surge in meaningful interaction.Picture: Pixabay

“The other benefit we have seen is a reduction in the cyber bullying and social media issues we’ve had to deal with as a school. In the younger years especially it has taken away that peer pressure to compare phones.”
Mrs Ethell said the school grounds had transformed into a cacophony of noise and activity as students rediscovered the joy of play.
“Girls are really engaged in interacting, playing table tennis or using other spaces around the school to do creative things or satisfy their curiosity,” she said.
The ban will remain in place next year and Mrs Ethell encouraged parents to extend boundaries around technology into their own homes, particularly their children’s bedrooms.
“The bedroom should be a sacred space for sleep and research has shown that the light from a mobile phone is not a good thing to have in there with you,” she said.
Mrs Ethell said parents had been supportive of the ban.
“There was an audible sigh of relief when I wrote to the Year 6 parents and told them not to worry about buying their kids phones for Christmas,” she said. “They don’t need them — we have plenty of phones here at the school that can get a message out to parents.”

MAKE A SMART CHOICE FOR KIDS

Jennifer Dudley-Nicholson
MORE than just decorative lights will be plugged in this Christmas, with almost half of all parents mulling over whether to buy their child a smartphone for the holiday.
While children entering high school have the best chance of finding a phone under the Christmas tree this year, new research reveals three in five 12-year-olds already own a mobile phone.
And even younger primary school students are increasingly slipping the devices into their backpacks.
But technology experts are warning parents they should carefully consider whether their child is ready for independent access to technology.
And they say it is a good idea to get kids to sign a contract before they hand over devices.
Research from Telstra this week revealed 45 per cent of parents with school-age children were debating whether to buy their child a smartphone this Christmas, with safety and greater independence top of mind.
More than six in 10 parental smartphone buyers said ensuring their child’s safety was their top motivating factor, and 12 years was the most common age to get a smartphone.
A study of more than 2000 Australian parents, conducted by Finder.com.au, also revealed more than 60 per cent of children owned a smartphone by the age of 12, but many were getting handsets much younger.
One in 10 Australian girls owned a smartphone by the age of four, and boys caught up at five years of age. That number doubled by the time the children turned 10 years old.
Finder.com.au telco expert Alex Kidman said children starting high school, or travelling to school independently, were often the deciding factors in buying them a smartphone, although 10 per cent of parents admitted they caved into their children’s demands for a device.
“Just under 20 per cent of parents said they were buying smartphones because their kids were making their own way to school,” he said.
“It means peace of mind, especially now there are so many prepaid plans now.”

TIPS

  • Draw up a smartphone contract outlining rules and responsibilities.
  • Buy a prepaid phone plan to guard against bill shock.
  • Consider whether you need to buy a new phone or can hand down an older model.
  • Invest in a sturdy smartphone case, like those from Tech21 and Otterbox.
  • Keep smartphones out of the bedroom.


https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/education/perth-college-records-drop-in-cyber-bullying-after-mobile-phone-ban-ng-b88682933z?utm_source=emarsys&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=PerthNow+PM+update+6%2F12%2F2017